2016 GOOGLE SCIENCE FAIR

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Secular Muslim teenagers from Turkey won more prizes in the Europe division of the 2016 Google science fair than teenagers from all western European countries combined.

Turkish girls Ezgi Balkir and Seray Uğur repeated experiments they had read about in scientific journals concerning bonding an enzyme (that destroys uric acid) to fabric.

Nureddin Kamadan likely enhanced software for the blind by adding the capability to recognize algebra symbols.
Adem Atalay Hüryaşar used light interference patterns (in a process similar to what Michelson and Morley had used in 1887 to measure the speed of light) to measure the thickness of a thin film transparent coating,

Gülce Afacan and Güler Selin Suna built a lithium ion battery, using purchased nanotubes to increase the surface area.

In Egypt, Ahmed Sherif coated microscopic particles of magnetized iron oxide with a thin coating of plastic in an experiment of removing heavy metal from contaminated water.

In Saudi Arabia, the son of a rich Bangladeshi entrepreneur built a robotic arm.

In the United States, Kashfia Rahman (wearing a Muslim scarf) performed an experiment on stress causing sleeping problems among teenagers at her school..

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800px-mit_building_10_and_the_great_dome_cambridge_ma

Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Secular Muslim teenagers from Turkey won more prizes in the Europe division of the 2016 Google science fair than teenagers from all western European countries combined.

https://www.googlesciencefair.com/en/

My guess is that the Turkish teenagers are seeking a ticket to escape from increasingly Islamic Turkey to universities in America.
None of the girls in Turkey wore a Muslim scarf.

Making a claim, whether true or not, that the teenager’s project will save the planet Earth, save lives, or help handicapped people increases the chances of winning a prize.

PRIZE WINNERS FROM TURKEY
In Turkey,  Ezgi Saygılı and Bora Akay submitted an entry about using high tech instruments to detect contamination in milk. I am guessing that they summarized what they had read in scientific journals, and did not actually have access to the high tech instruments. [Ezgi is by coincidence the first name of a Turkish actress whose clothing reveals a lot of cleavage. Bora is the name of the Greek god of the cold northern wind.]

Turkish girls Ezgi Balkir and Seray Uğur repeated experiments they had read about in scientific journals concerning bonding an enzyme (that destroys uric acid) to fabric. Destroying uric acid in this way is a potential gout treatment discussed in medical journals. [Both Ezgi and Seray are by coincidence the first names of Turkish actresses whose clothing reveals a lot of cleavage.]

In Turkey, Nureddin Kamadan created something to help the blind to read. I assume it was an enhancement to existing software for converting printed letters into spoken Turkish, but adding the capability to recognize algebra symbols.

Two teenage girls in Turkey (Ilayda Sırbaş and Ezgi Tezer) showed that heavy weights can be placed on top of a board on top of several aluminum cans without the cans being crushed, and from this falsely claimed that aluminum cans stacked inside hollow concrete pillars would prevent the concrete pillars from being crushed by the shaking and shearing forces of an earthquake. The method they proposed had been tried ten years earlier in Taiwan and failed.

[The first name Ilayda means a water fairy of European mythology. Ezgi is by coincidence the first name of a Turkish actress whose clothing reveals a lot of cleavage.]

In Turkey, Adem Atalay Hüryaşar used light interference patterns (in a process similar to what Michelson and Morley had used in 1887 to measure the speed of light) to measure the thickness of a thin film transparent coating,

In Turkey, Gülce Afacan and Güler Selin Suna built a lithium ion battery, using purchased nanotubes to increase the surface area. Using nanotubes to increase the surface area in batteries is a hot topic in science journals. [Güler is a girl’s name that means “she smiles”.]

In Turkey,  Efe Şenoğlu and Oğuzhan Yıldırım devised some sort of laboratory test for identifying pathogenic micro-organisms, but the summary is unclear, and the detail is written in Turkish. [The name Oğuzhan refers to the ancient legend of Oghuz, who prayed to a pagan sky god.]

In Turkey, Gizem Ağtaş and Gizem Baykal showed that waste from silk production could absorb oil, and proposed that it be used to absorb oil from oil spills in rivers and lakes.


MUSLIM PRIZE WINNER FROM THE UNITED STATES
In the United States, Kashfia Rahman performed an experiment on stress mindset among teenagers at her school.
She created stressful situations for half of her test subjects but not for the control subjects. Then the next day she interviewed them to ask such questions as if they had trouble sleeping the previous night. Her hair and neck are covered by a Muslim scarf.

MUSLIM PRIZE WINNERS FROM OTHER COUNTRIES
Zain Ahmed Samdani, a Bangladeshi living in Saudi Arabia, built a robotic exoskeleton hand somewhat like the experimental exoskeletons invented by contractors for the United States Army, and similar to those shown in childrens cartoons on television. I assume he is the son of the wealthy Bangladeshi businessman Rajeeb Samdani, whose Islamic banking and data processing companies do substantial business in Saudi Arabia.

In Egypt, Ahmed Sherif coated microscopic particles of magnetized iron oxide with a thin coating of plastic in an experiment of removing heavy metal from contaminated water. He likely borrowed from such journal articles as the Chinese research at https://scholar.google.com/scholar?cluster=11727879031264218260&hl=en&as_sdt=0,5&sciodt=0,5  but made some changes of his own.

In Egypt, Abdelrahman Osama covered carbon with green leaves and alcohol, creating a voltage difference, but did not seem to understand that efficiency in converting light to electricity is measured by watts of power produced, not by voltage with almost no amps. This “solar cell” was very much inferior to the leaf-powered “solar cell” a researcher at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology had built 3 years earlier. Even the MIT “solar cell” was completely impractical because such a tiny proportion of the light (a tenth of a percent) was converted to electricity. Even if the efficiency of the cell were increased a hundredfold, it would be expensive to maintain because of the need to replenish the alcohol and the dying leaves.

Google did not permit any entries from Iran because of sanctions.

I did not include prizes won by Hindus and ethnic Russians living in majority Muslim countries.

Image by John Phelan, via Wikimedia Commons
image credit https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:MIT_Building_10_and_the_Great_Dome,_Cambridge_MA.jpg#mw-jump-to-license

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